Sunday, January 20, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 3: Unusual Name

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 3 - Unusual Name
Phariba - Pharaba - Fariba

I’ve decided to join Amy Johnson Crow’s 2019 challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.  I haven’t been successful in following through in the past, but some stories are better than none!  I hope you find these interesting, and if you think we might be related let me know, and if you are related and/or have more information for me, I would certainly appreciate it.

This weeks prompt is "Unusual Name."  I have a few in my tree, but my Great x3 (Genealogy shorthand for Great, Great, Great) maternal Grandmother's name is the one that has intrigued me over the years.  Partly because her surname makes me wonder if I'm related to the feuding Hatfields, but it's mostly because Phariba is so unusual - at least to me.  

I discovered that there were actually 1.75 million entries that come up if you search for Phariba on Ancestry.com.   There are three women on facebook with that name plus two more whose names are in a different language alphabet.  One site I looked at said there are less than 2,700 people living today with this name which can also be spelled Fariba.   It apparently is of ancient Persian origin and means lovely, charming, and enticing.

My Phariba was born in 1791 in Russell County, Virginia to Joseph Hatfield and Rachel Smith.  Some people list her name as "Phariba (Phoebe) Hatfield" which may be because of the unusual name and in the 1850 census Ancestry indexed it as "Phoriba" although I think it is a sloppy "a" instead of an "o."  I'm not sure where they got the name Phoebe* - maybe just trying to make it fit in today's world. 







One of Phariba's daughters was Rachel Reed who married Samuel McDonald who were the parents of Dillie McDonald the Great Grandmother I wrote about last week.  Her oldest daughter also had the name Phariba, and I had forgotten but I also have an inlaw of a second cousin who died as 10-year-old in 1904.  Although these families lived in the same general area of Kentucky and Scott County Tennessee, One set is my Mother's maternal line and the other is in my Mother's paternal line. They are the only ones in my tree at this time.  I haven't been able to track her after 1860.  


I haven't done a lot of research on her since I live so far away and I rely on others research.  My son and I are in her DNA Circle along with 202 other probable descendants.




*Some people have her listed as Phoebe Reed in the 1870 Census in Georgia, Blind and living with an apparent son James.  I don't think that is her.  Findagrave has Phariba dying in 1840, but I don't believe that is correct either.  I've messaged the Hatfield descendant that created the memorial so will have to wait for her to respond to find out her source - I could be wrong.  

Interesting how writing what you know, tends to raise more questions.




Monday, January 14, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 2 - Challenge

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 2 – Challenge Favorite Photo

I’ve decided to join Amy Johnson Crow’s 2019 challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.  I haven’t been successful in following through in the past, but some stories are better than none!  I hope you find these interesting, if you think we might be related let me know, and if you are related and/or have more information for me I would certainly appreciate it.

Well, the topic Challenge was too big a challenge for me and I decided to write on one of the topics from last year that I didn't complete. "Favorite Photo" was the one I chose.  

The challenge rules are extremely flexible with the goal of getting us to write family stories.  Amy wrote this in this week's email: "If you haven't done the 52 Ancestors challenge before, you might be a bit surprised at the prompts. Yes, they are vague. That's by design. There is no right or wrong way to interpret the prompts. The goal is to spark ideas for your writing. Each week, I'll give some suggestions, but they are just that — suggestions. 

You do not need to blog to do this challenge. Some people keep a journal or make scrapbook pages. Some people post a photo on Instagram. Others send an email to family members. The goal is to write something and get those discoveries out of your genealogy software and into a format that others can see and enjoy." 


MY FAVORITE PHOTO


This is my favorite photo because I wondered for years if anyone in the family had a photo of her.   Her daughter, Verda had a picture of her husband but as far as I knew she didn't have a photo of her Mother.

She is my Great Grandmother, Dillie McDonald Strunk. Dillie was a twin - her sister was Millie.  She was born in Scott County Tennessee to Samuel and Rebecca Reed McDonald in November of 1858.  



She married George Washington Strunk in 1875 about a week before her 17th Birthday.  George was 25 years old.  In 1870, George was living with his parents and was a "clerk in store."  By 1880,  living in Huntsville, Scott County Tennessee, George was a "Register of Deeds" and they were the parents of three, 2 sons and a daughter.

In the 1900 Census, they have moved across the state line into McCreary County Kentucky.   George is working as a "Coal Weighmaster" and they have 11 living children.  The census record states she is the mother of 11 with 10 living.  





However, there are 11 children listed and I know (99% sure I copied his name and dates from the family Bible back in the 1960's and have since misplaced those hand written notes) that Leslie Lane Strunk was born in 1888 and died in 1889.  There was also an Elma Strunk, twin to Velma,  b April 1897 and died 30 Nov 1897 - information also from the Family Bible.

Dillie died on 17 Jan 1901 at the age of 43.  I've never heard of her dying in Childbirth, but it is a possibility even if she was 43 years old.  But after 12 pregnancies in 25 years and losing two children, I'm sure she was worn out and susceptible to many diseases.




The photo of Dillie was received from my first cousin, Dillie Weddle Sanders daughter in 2016. It was a tremendous surprise.







Sources:
 https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46311616
George Washington Strunk Family Bible - Last known in possession of Vera Strunk Green Coleman's Granddaughter.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/54418771/deliah-strunk   (In 1870 Census she is listed as Delilah but so far that is the only source of the name)
Clips from the 1870 and 1900 Censuses





Sunday, January 6, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 1 - First

I've decided to join Amy Johnson Crow's 2019 challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.  I haven't been successful in following through in the past, but some stories are better than none!  I hope you find these interesting, and if you think we might be related, let me know.


Week 1:  First

The first ancestor I met was my Grandma Verda.  She was my maternal Grandmother who lived in Dayton, Ohio when I met her at six years of age. We lived in San Diego County in a rural area with a mailing address of El Cajon.  I probably should say California, but most of you know that is where San Diego is located.  Mother (and I as a teenager and adult) exchanged letters and occasional phone calls with Grandma, but due to the distance, we didn't visit.  During the War years Grandma and my Aunt Dillie, Aunt Eleanor, and Uncle Ray came out to visit.  I have a photo of all of us on the beach, and I look like I'm about 1 year old so that would be 1944. As you might guess, I don't remember that meeting.

Dillie Weddle, Verda Strunk Weddle Jeffers, Eleanor Jeffers, Ray Jeffers standing, Gerry (me) and Ruth Patterson


The majority of people today are too young to remember when phone calls were expensive.  When families earned $200 - $300 per month, a $2 or $3 phone call was considered for special occasions or emergencies. In case anyone is interested, in the late 60's I worked for several months in the personnel office of our local Sears store.   I'll never forget seeing the wage history of one woman who had started working in 1948 and her starting pay was $.50 per hour.  Another First,   for me recognizing the changes over the years.

In 1948, Mother and I traveled to Dayton with some Sailors who were driving back east.  Ride Sharing was pretty common back then as well as picking up hitchhikers - especially Sailors in San Diego.  That was my first long Road Trip.  It was also the first time I visited my Grandmother and met my Step-Grandfather and my Mother's half brother and sister.

My Aunt was a petite little girl who was 11 years to my 5, and I was probably almost as tall as she was.  I definitely was the following summer when my family drove back to see them again.  My Uncle was a typical 13-year-old boy who didn't want to have much to do with his little niece.  I also probably embarrassed him by asking him to read to me.  That was my First experience with someone with learning difficulties.  Dyslexia wasn't a known condition at that time, and I'm sure it caused him a lot of problems.  I've never talked to him about it, but I've always believed that was his problem once I learned about dyslexia.

#52Ancestors


Friday, April 6, 2018

H IS FOR HATFIELD



April 2018

I decided to continue using the 2016 A to Z logos since I had created the pages but not the posts.  I have over 20,000 people in my family tree so have lots of possibilities for posts.

H IS FOR HATFIELD,

My Maternal Great (x3) Grandmother is Phariba Hatfield.  Don't you just love that first name!  So far, I haven't found any other family members with that name other than her oldest daughter.  Of course, Phariba was born in 1795 so that makes records pretty scarce, especially when you are unable to travel to the family locales.  

I've tried to see if there was a family connection to the infamous Hatfield's of the Hatfields and McCoys, but other than that Phariba was born in Virginia, I can't make the connection.  Just discovered another tree that has her birthdate as 1791 which makes more sense.  Her first child was born in 1808. Looks like she had 18 children including three sets of twins.  No wonder there are 139 members in her DNA Circle on Ancestry.com.

Some confusion as to her date of death.  Some people have it at 1840, but I found her in the 1850 census so I believe she died sometime in the 1850's since I couldn't find her in the 1860 census.










Monday, January 29, 2018

G is for George

Well, I wrote this a couple of years ago and never published it.  So decided to go ahead and publish it now.





I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (April 2016), where we write 26 blog posts featuring each letter of the alphabet.  Each blogger can choose whatever subject matter they want.

Obviously, my interest is in Genealogy (categorized as History/Mythology for the Challenge), so I'll be posting short bios of my or my husband's ancestors.  Hopefully, this will give me the incentive to keep it up, at least for a month. Who knows, it might create a good habit.  

GEORGE WASHINGTON STRUNK
(b 30 April 1850 - d 27 Jan 1933)


One of the first things I remember learning about my Great Grandfather was the fact that he was named George Washington.  This was kind of funny because my Mother's 3 Grandfathers were all named for Presidents.  George Washington Strunk, Abraham Lincoln Weddle, and her Step-Grandfather, Thomas Jefferson Jeffers.  
George W  Strunk and Dillie McDonald marriage record.





George married Dillie McDonald on 18 Nov. 1875.   They had 13 children.



His family in the 1900 Census
.
Dillie died in 1901.  In 1902, George married Lizzie Lancaster Toomey and added three step-daughters to the family.  The oldest Step-daughter, Mabel Toomey married his son, Edward Luther Strunk.


Snapshot of George on Marsh Creek probably taken in the years shortly before he died in 1933.





Thursday, April 7, 2016

F is for Mary Estella Flaugh



I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (April 2016), where we write 26 blog posts featuring each letter of the alphabet.  Each blogger can choose whatever subject matter they want.

Obviously, my interest is in Genealogy (categorized as History/Mythology for the Challenge), so I'll be posting short bios of my or my husband's ancestors.  Hopefully, this will give me the incentive to keep it up, at least for a month.  Who knows, it might create a good habit. 


MARY ESTELLA FLAUGH
(b 1 Jan 1921 - d 16 Jun 2009)

Mary's High School Graduation photo 1939-1940

The following is a transcription of the Memorial Handout written by her daughter Carolyn.

"Mary Estella Humes was born Jan 1, 1921, in Pagosa Springs, Colorado to Tom and Mabel Carman Flaugh. Raised on a cattle ranch in an area at the foot of the Rockies, surrounded by trees, lakes, and rivers. Milking cows, gathering eggs, raking hay, riding horses and fishing for trout were part of her everyday life. She always loved the aspens in the fall with the rich colors of autumn. She got frostbitten, stabbed with a pitchfork, teased by her brothers and by her dad, who she always called "Tom" instead of Dad. She took care of her Mom, who was often ill. She played basketball, was in the Drama Club, and always wished she could sing.

Married December 31, 1940, in Yuma, Arizona to James Hallie Humes (also from Pagosa Springs), and immediately moved to San Diego. She was a wonderful daughter and sister, and a great mother to her two children, Cecil, and Carolyn. Mary was a fun, loving and affectionate grandmother and great grandmother! Mom loved the Padres and the Chargers, and would follow their games enthusiastically. She was a talented and impeccable seamstress, floral designer and homemaker. Her friends adored her, as did her nieces and nephews, children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren! She will be dearly missed by all of us."




James Hallie and Mary Flaugh Humes, their wedding photo
Mary at her son's wedding 1964
Mary's daughter Carolyn, Grandson Cole, and Mary at Cole's Wedding 


Wednesday, April 6, 2016

E IS FOR EMILY ELIZABETH CAIN

I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge (April 2016), where we write 26 blog posts featuring each letter of the alphabet.  Each blogger can choose whatever subject matter they want.

Obviously, my interest is in Genealogy (categorized as History/Mythology for the Challenge), so I'll be posting short bios of my or my husband's ancestors.  Hopefully, this will give me the incentive to keep it up, at least for a month. Who knows, it might create a good habit.  



  

Emily Elizabeth Cain

b 7 Jan 1869 - d 24 Jul 1933 

 


Emily Elizabeth Cain, daughter of Milford J and Nancy Jane Weddle Cain, was born 7 Jan 1869 in Caintown, Pulaski County, Kentucky.  Emily was the oldest daughter and the second born of the family's six children.  Milford was a farmer.

"Lizzie" married Abe Weddle on 15 Feb 1885 at her parent's home by J. J. Cooper. (http://www.therainwatercollection.com/allied-bible.shtml#a)  Elizabeth's Great Grandfather was her husband's Grandfather, John Milton Weddle (b 1776 - d 1842.) Elizabeth's Maternal Grandfather, Daniel Spencer Weddle (b 1817 - d 1885) was the older brother of Lincoln's Father, Solomon Weddle (b1822 - d 1890.)

I love how all my ancestors used different versions of their names throughout the years.  Emily Elizabeth was Emily, Elizabeth, and Lizzie on different records.  Abraham Lincoln was Abraham, Abe, Lincoln, A L, and Abe on different records.

 Elizabeth was the mother of Herbert Cain Weddle (b 1887 - d 1926), Lida Ella (b 1890-d 1959), Nannie Helen (b 1898 - d 1970), Minnie Pauline (b 1901 - d 1990), and Martha Elizabeth Weddle (b 1907 - d 1983).


Weddle Family about 1903: Abraham Lincoln, Nancy Helen, Herbert Cain, Lida Ellen, Minnie Pauline, and Emily Elizabeth Cain.  Date of photo estimated from Pauline's birth year of 1901


 Below is a family photo taken about 12 years later.  Herbert is married and away from home.  This includes daughter born after previous photo.


Note from my Aunt Libby identifying family members. Picture was probably taken about 1916 since youngest daughter was born 1907 and family moved to Mississippi in 1917.


 Their middle child, Helen, married a young man she met at Berea College.  He became a Realtor in Mississippi, and sold her parents some land in Mississippi in 1917 and they established a farm.

Their son Herbert, died in 1926.  Due to health problems his wife couldn't care for their children so Abe and Emily took the two youngest children home to Mississippi.  Later, the youngest girl returned to her mother, but the middle daughter didn't want to return to her mother.  After Abe's death, the two Elizabeth's moved to Sangamon, Illinois. I found them there in the 1930 census, living near the Weddle daughter, Ella Sievers. 

Elizabeth Cain Weddle died 24 July, 1933.  She is buried next to her husband and near her son, parents, and quite a few siblings in the Somerset City Cemetery in Somerset Kentucky.